The Solution to Illegal Migration Is Simple

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Periodic NOVA TownHall Blog contributor The Yooper sends the following post:


The proposed solutions so far are impossible. We cannot secure all our borders and shorelines. This tide of illegals will seek to find any weak spot. New industries will spring up. It is akin to piling up sand to hold back the water of a flood. Water has the power of gravity and the resulting pressure on it's side. It will find a way through. It may be transporting illegals from the south around to Canada and across our Northern border. Making watertight borders is not the best solution.

Neither is amnesty a workable solution. Once illegals are given amnesty, or whatever antiseptic name it is given, they must pay taxes and their employers must pay FICA and benefits and all the rest. There goes the cheap labor unless we continue to allow employers to pay for any labor under the table and break the law.

And I did not even mention the unfairness to people who would attempt to immigrate legally! Those we should continue to welcome to our country as they learn English, our history and want to become Americans.

Now, the solution is to heavily fine and ultimately seize the property of those employers who are hiring illegals. Take away the attraction for illegals and the flow of illegals will cease. They might even find their own way home. After all, cheap labor will go away if they are all given guest worker cards anyway (assuming employers pay FICA, withholding, etc). And do not pay them welfare and unemployment. That is the price we must pay.

Who is against this? The liberals, who claim to hear the cries of hungry babies, the Chambers of Commerce who see cheap labor and politicians who smell votes. Oh, and the illegals will take to the streets to demand our kindness. The worst part is they may win that battle in the same manner the Muslims have won in France. It is now or later folks.

I say take the billions it would cost to build a wall and spend it on tracking down and punishing those employers that hire illegals!!!

--The Yooper


The Yoop-meister keys in on one of the key planks in Rep. J.D. Hayworth's strategy to fix America's immigration problem. I agree that cracking down on employers would solve the problem immediately, but realistically I think that's going to take time to get through Congress.

A fence could easily be put up in the meantime. From my perspective, that would be the 'simple' solution.

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9 Comments

stay puft marshmallow man said:

I Blame America First. We convinced Mexico into signing on to NAFTA. That's free trade, free flows of goods and services across the border (but not labor). Agriculture is only one area that's been impacted by our policies. I assume you'd agree that the US is the only Superpower in the world; we have to be able to accept that, as the most powerful nation, our actions are going to have an impact on other countries.

Now our (government subsidized) agricultural goods are being sold in Mexico for less money than Mexican farmers can even produce them at. It's called dumping, and it's forced semi-trailers full of Mexican farmers off their land, because they can't possibly compete. Where are they going to go? NORTH!

it's osmosis, baby!

People will go where the jobs are, they will do what they have to do. Whether the US immigration policy has caught up with the mess US foreign trade policy has created is of little concern to someone in Mexico with hungry kids who lost their farm/job. But I suppose mentioning starving kids isn't going to fly with The Yooper, so here's a good article about subsidized US corn exports and Mexico's economy.

Don't worry, if the article doesn't make you feel all warm and fuzzy about AMERICA, you can easily disregard it as left-wing propaganda because the organization that published the report has the word "international" in its name, and they focus on things like POVERTY and HEALTHCARE.

booyah!

Oxfam? Aren't they the NGO proudly supporting dictators, terrorists and kleptocracies all around the globe? I think it's groups like Oxfam that keep the poor poor by advocating financial support for corrupt government officials. (And yes, Stay Puft, that's where a large share of the "aid" money ends up going. Also, the nice man with the three card monte table on the street corner is actually ripping people off). I think Mexico's biggest problems are A) corrupt government and B) abysmal educational level of so many people. I'll admit I'm no expert, so maybe corn dumping is another. But if Oxfam is your source for that info, I'd suggest you probably need to get out more. Thanks for commenting.

stay puft marshmallow man said:

Dear kneejerk,

While I'll admit it was a nice way for you to dodge the issue, I do not believe Oxfam has advocated giving aid to dictators. Perhaps you were thinking of the World Bank.

but let's just pretend they did, does that mean that the removal of tariffs on agricultural imports hasn't had a negative impact on Mexico's economy?

but let's just pretend it hasn't, that it's all the Mexican government's fault. That doesn't change the fact that here are people without jobs in Mexico who are, one could argue, "victims of a corrupt government." That's exactly what amnesty is for. If we shouldn't give a shit about their situation, than logically we shouldn't give a shit about Cubans or Iraqis either, right?

also, are you really from da UP, cuz I'm in ANN ARBOR, biatch!

"While I'll admit it was a nice way for you to dodge the issue, I do not believe Oxfam has advocated giving aid to dictators. Perhaps you were thinking of the World Bank."

Nope, I was thinking of Oxfam.

"but let's just pretend they did, does that mean that the removal of tariffs on agricultural imports hasn't had a negative impact on Mexico's economy?"

No it doesn't, I grant you that.

"but let's just pretend it hasn't, that it's all the Mexican government's fault. That doesn't change the fact that here are people without jobs in Mexico who are, one could argue, "victims of a corrupt government." That's exactly what amnesty is for. If we shouldn't give a shit about their situation, than logically we shouldn't give a shit about Cubans or Iraqis either, right?"

Yeah, right, 'logically' if anyone is granted asylum in the U.S., then we'd also have to invite everyone else in the world to live here.

By the same 'logic' if I order a copy of The Communist Manifesto from Amazon, I would also be obligated to buy one from every other online bookseller.

"also, are you really from da UP, cuz I'm in ANN ARBOR, biatch!"

I am guessing The Yooper is from there, but I never asked. He only stops by here every couple weeks so maybe he will clear that up. He's not me though.

Forgive me if this is a dumb question: What makes you proclaim your presence in Ann Arbor with such fervor? Or is that some local theme, like "Virginia is for Lovers" or "I'm going to Disneyland!"

Be that as it may, I do respect your argument that U.S. trade policy could have a negative effect on Mexico's economy. I don't know the facts so I can't dismiss it or affirm it. I do think the other factors loom large in Mexico's problems however.

Davis said:

"I'm going to Disneyland"...that's too funny.

Hometown pride is a dying tradition.

stay puft marshmallow man said:

See, people in the UP think the packers are their home team, but they're wrong, the lions are their home team, even though the lions suck.

My cuba/iraq point was that we are at war, supposedly on behalf of people who were oppressed by a corrupt undemocratic government, while at the same time telling Mexicans that it's not our problem if their government is corrupt and undemocratic. it seems a little ironic to be willing to lay down American lives for people half way around the world while complaining about giving our shit jobs to our own neighbors. that was the 'logic' or lack of it, I was trying to get at.

but Pew research just published an interesting survey/report on Hispanics in America, which examined the economic impact of undocumented workers on our economy and on Latin American economies, how many of them pay taxes, which taxes, which social services they use, etc. It shows if you subtract the amount they take from the economy in terms of the social services they use, from the amount they contribute in property and sales taxes, over their lifetime the average undocumented worker contributes $80,000 to state and federal government.

The Pew study also shows that these workers account for $800 billion in economic activity every year. That means that, without them, our gdp would drop by $800 billion dollars, which sounds painful

I hope you don't think the pew research center supports dictators, because I'm having a hard time finding these statistics in the Bible (it's GOTTA be somewhere in Exxodus).

At for free trade, if Mexico put a tariff on our subsidized corn, we'd whine about their protectionist, anti-free-market actions, yet 4437 is basically a bill to protect domestic labor against the forces of the international labor market. NAFTA hasn't worked for Mexico, we ('we' being the heritage foundation, et al) insist that what Mexico needs is MORE free trade, while at the same time we're pushing for anti-free trade legislation in the US (in the name of combating terrorism, which is ridiculous because the Canadian border is even less guarded then the Mexican one, and the 911 dudes had passports and papers, anyway)

NACLA, which has been accused by heritage foundation of supporting Marxist groups, published this paper which says the same stuff as the oxfam report.

The Heritage Foundation, which accuses every non-profit organization that doesn't advocate tax cuts for the rich of supporting Marxist groups, published an article which basically says that in the 10 years since NAFTA passed, things have gotten worse for labor in Mexico, although it recognize NAFTA's role in that downward spiral, and actually argues for more free trade to fix the Mexican economy.

Also, a super sweet book that deals with the market-distorting effects of subsidized agriculture in the US is "The Travels of a T-Shirt in the Global Economy," by Pietra Rivoli.

Not that anyone's reading this, but I suppose I've said what I wanted to say.

Go Blue! (next year)

Good comment, thanks - I've brought it up to the main page. So I think some people will in fact be reading this. Don't be a stranger.

American said:


The American National Anthem


Oh Jose cant you see, we're tired of supporting thee.

When you snuck acrossed the border, it began an illegal plight.

Over broad stripes and bright stars, We'll continue to Fight.

Mexican Flags we did watch, that were so sadly streaming.

Our tempers did flare, with Mexican's everywhere.

Gave proof to the nite, we must send them back there.

O say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave.

For the land of the U. S. Citizen and the home of the American's.


written and produced by U.S. Citizens
Made In America

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